Papertab: Washable Computing?

papertabAn amazing piece of development by a public/private consortium. It’s an obvious evolution from tablet computing and although it obviously has a long way to go, the implications for virtual worlds-based education is obvious, particularly in the health field where hardy devices are needed that can easily be cleaned.

In 5 to 10 years I can see options like this achieving exactly that. If the price point ends up being reasonable, it’s also a great option at the pre-registration training level. Taking purely a virtual worlds perspective, if I can load up a good immersive simulation on something like the Papertab, hand it out to participants at the beginning of a session, walk them through the simulation and allow them to walk out with it, I have to be be making some inroads. That’s without the collaboration and interaction options already being shown between each Papertab. Of course, it’ll depend on how successfully the developers can move from the gray-scale version on offer now, but I’d imagine that’s a given over a period of years.

Have a look for yourself:

The full press release:

Cambridge, UK and Kingston, Canada – January 7, 2013 — Watch out tablet lovers — A flexible paper computer developed at Queen’s University in collaboration with Plastic Logic and Intel Labs will revolutionize the way people work with tablets and computers. The PaperTab tablet looks and feels just like a sheet of paper. However, it is fully interactive with a flexible, high-resolution 10.7″ plastic display developed by Plastic Logic, a flexible touchscreen, and powered by the second generation Intel® Core i5 processor. Instead of using several apps or windows on a single display, users have ten or more interactive displays or “papertabs”: one per app in use.

Ryan Brotman, research scientist at Intel elaborates “We are actively exploring disruptive user experiences. the ‘PaperTab’ project, developed by the Human Media Lab at Queen’s University and Plastic Logic, demonstrates innovative interactions powered by Intel core processors that could potentially delight tablet users in the future.”

“Using several PaperTabs makes it much easier to work with multiple documents,” says Roel Vertegaal, director of Queen’s University’s Human Media Lab. “Within five to ten years, most computers, from ultra-notebooks to tablets, will look and feel just like these sheets of printed color paper.”

“Plastic Logic’s flexible plastic displays are completely transformational in terms of product interaction. they allow a natural human interaction with electronic paper, being lighter, thinner and more robust compared with today’s standard glass-based displays. this is just one example of the innovative revolutionary design approaches enabled by flexible displays.” explains Indro Mukerjee, CEO of Plastic Logic.

What’s your take on this?

[via Stuff.tv]